The New Sound of Silent Film
The songless musical "Chicago"
with Live Score by Bassist Tom Peters
March 16, 2012

Bassist Tom Peters provides the live musical score for the little known silent film “Chicago.” The 2003 the filmed version of the 1975 Broadway musical Chicago won six Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Supporting Actress for Catherine Zeta Jones, and has become a beloved favorite. But the story of murderess Roxie Hart has been around for more than 86 years, and the 2002 version is not the first to make it to the screen. 

This performance begins at 8pm. 

The 2003 the filmed version of the 1975 Broadway musical Chicago won six Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Supporting Actress for Catherine Zeta Jones, and has become a beloved favorite. But the story of murderess Roxie Hart has been around for more than 86 years, and the 2002 version is not the first to make it to the screen.
 
Chicago was first presented in 1926 as a very popular comic Broadway stage play by Maureen Dallas Watkins, based on her experiences as a sensationalistic police reporter for The Chicago Tribune. The popularity of the play caught the attention of auteur Cecil B. DeMille, who purchased the rights from Watkins for $25,000. Although the director credit is given to Frank Urson, it is clear to many film historians that DeMille himself directed the film. The film was a huge hit.
 
So why is this version virtually unknown? Like so many films from the silent era, Chicago was thought to have been lost. In 2006, an almost pristine copy of the film was discovered in Cecil B. DeMille’s personal archive and was digitally restored by the UCLA Film and Television Archive.
 
Even after 86 years, Chicago is a savagely funny film with a virtuoso performance by former Max Sennett Bathing Beauty Phyllis Haver.

Chicago was first presented in 1926 as a very popular comic Broadway stage play by Maureen Dallas Watkins, based on her experiences as a sensationalistic police reporter for The Chicago Tribune. The popularity of the play caught the attention of auteur Cecil B. DeMille, who purchased the rights from Watkins for $25,000. Although the director credit is given to Frank Urson, it is clear to many film historians that DeMille himself directed the film. The film was a huge hit. 

So why is this version virtually unknown? Like so many films from the silent era, Chicago was thought to have been lost. In 2006, an almost pristine copy of the film was discovered in Cecil B. DeMille’s personal archive and was digitally restored by the UCLA Film and Television Archive. 

Even after 86 years, Chicago is a savagely funny film with a virtuoso performance by former Max Sennett Bathing Beauty Phyllis Haver.

Click here to get a taste of the music.

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